School of Hope Fights to Retrieve Funding from D.I.Y White Savior Industrial Complex

“Rebuild School of Hope” chuffed.org campaign page — the campaign is currently unavailable/closed by the administrator

Of course it was during Black History Month when I had to hear about another white savior situation in continental Africa. When the School of Hope building in the Kibera community of Nairobi, Kenya burned down in March of 2016, Australians Yuki Devine and Duncan Pedrana offered to raise funds for a new and improved structure. School of Hope is run by Gabriel (Gabi) Nerima Oboki in the largest urban slum in continental Africa.* School of Hope was established in 1999 by Gabi’s father…


*as an anti-oppressive social (justice) movement

Veganism, as an anti-oppressive social (justice) movement, is in crisis.

Recent iterations of anti-Black and antisemitic social media posts by influencer-activist vegans vividly exposed white supremacy in veganism, “white veganism”. In response, Black, brown, Indigenous, POC and ally vegan and plant based advocates and activists have pushed for more introspection in veganism to root out white supremacy and layered forms of oppression.

These racist posts harken to early campaigns of vegan centered animal rights organizations, like PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), who throughout the 2000s and 2010s vividly compared nonhuman animal suffering with U.S. chattel slavery and…


Daniel Betty (my grandfather and grandson of Dublin Lee), Hartibel Betty (my Grandmother) and my Uncle Atlee, around 1960 in Jamaica.

Around 1880, my great-great grandfather Dublin Lee arrived in Jamaica from China as part of a migration stream that would labor in coffee, sugar, and cocoa plantations of the Caribbean.

His migration was rooted in colonialism: Hong Kong became a part of the British Empire in 1842 and an integral British port in the Pacific.

His migration was also rooted in xenophobia: the U.S. government implemented the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1855, the 1875 Page Act and incoming 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act. Increasing white American nativism established local, regional, and federal US policies that affected Chinese and Chinese American communities…


White supremacy is a death cult.

As we are in the midst of a coup 🤷🏿‍♀️ Let’s talk about why Republican US Congress members advocating for an 1877-esque Election Commission to decide the 2020 election is disturbing.

The 1876 Samuel Tilden (Democrat)/Rutherford B. Haynes (Republican) election literally streamline Black disenfranchisement and white supremacist terrorism.

*Please remember the two party system was the same BS we are dealing with now, but switch Democrats and Republicans … it’s a long story, but in general Democrats were proslavery and pro-Black disenfranchisement (openly) during this Civil War/Reconstruction period.

The 1876 election stands as the…


Addressing Keke Palmer and Decolonizing Black Health, Wellness, and Healing

When I first encountered Keke Palmer’s tweet suggesting EBT (Electronic Benefits Transfer card) should ONLY be used for “healthy items” I was triggered. Growing up food insecure with chronic asthma, I deeply acknowledge the systemic restrictions placed on marginalized communities to access nutrient dense foods, clean water, and live in environmentally safe spaces. This acknowledgement has always stood as a counterpoint to dislocated elite centered solutions impacting the realities of 42 million American (including 20 million children) Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)/Food Stamps recipients.


Why does Beyoncé™ overtly promote blackface while capitalizing off images of “Black Power” and “Black Royalty”?

Example of modern blackfacing around the globe: Random images of white Arab women blackfacing — this blackface was done “in solidarity” with Black Lives Matter protests over the summer.

“Beyoncé™ is not Black, she is OJ.” As I wrapped my head around how Beyoncé could claim to promote Black royalty, sovereignty, pride, and excellence in Black Is King just a few months ago, then now propagate imagery of two white women blackfacing in her fast fashion Ivy Park brand on Instagram (@weareivypark) — this pieced together quote resonated in my mind. I am not comparing Beyoncé to the defamed American football legend OJ Simpson. If this is what you think, stop reading now.

“I am not Black, I’m OJ” was a statement privately made by Simpson to his counsel…


Let’s talk about Blackface as Minstrelsy, Blackfishing, and cultural appropriation

Irenne Dunne in Show Boat (1936) — https://www.themakeupgallery.info/racial/minstrel/showboatid.htm

This week while watching Girlfriends (2000–2008) on Netflix, I became annoyed. Although revisiting the show presented all types of problematic early 2000s narratives about Black life, womanhood, and community, I still accepted the nostalgia linked with consuming “my favorite show” as a teenager.

In the episode entitled, “Sister, Sistah” the audience is introduced to Lynn’s sister Tanya as a head wrap wearing, Afrocentric white woman displaying intonations of AAVE. The character of Tanya, played by Eliza Schneider, is well traveled throughout Africa and very comfortable around Black people.

In the midst of Jessica Krug’s recent blackface appropriation for personal and…


Centering whiteness while claiming (and un-claiming) Blackness & Why I personally call for reparations

Sourced from Instagram, Nuestra Matria Borken, @nuestra_patriapr

Recently GWU Africana Studies Associate Professor Jessica Krug came out in a personal blog on medium as a fraud. She self-outed as pretending to be Black for decades for personal and professional gain.

I graduated from George Washington University in 2008. Although I do not know Krug or her work, I know the department she is coming from relatively well. And honestly, I can feel the tired reverberating from Black faculty in the Africana Studies department that I know and love. …


Garveyism, Black sovereignty, and the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) and African Communities League

Marcus Aurelius “Mosiah” Garvey

Marcus Aurelius “Mosiah” Garvey was born in St. Ann’s parish, Jamaica in 1887. Having apprenticed as a printer, he voyaged to Limón, Costa Rica and Panama in 1910 where he began his career in radical journalism.[1] Garvey traveled to London that same year where he joined the Pan African journal, the African and Orient Review, edited by Egyptian Duse Muhammed.[2] In 1914, Garvey returned to Jamaica and founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) and African Communities League with Amy Ashwood (Garvey) under the motto, “one god, one aim, one destiny!” …


In the midst of protest and pandemic, how should we engage with Beyoncé and Disney’s Black Is King?

Design by Shari Betty

On June 28th, 2020 Beyoncé Knowles-Carter announced the release of her visual album Black Is King to debut on Disney+ July 31st, 2020. Black Is King is an extension of The Lion King (2019) soundtrack, “The Gift”, and in collaboration with well-known artists from continental Africa. Social media has given us insight into the pressing concerns regarding this production, the most outspoken being from the continent: Does the Disney/Beyoncé collaboration exhibit features of cultural appropriation by depicting Africa through a stereotypical Americocentric lens? Will Africans on the continent have access to the visual production as Disney+ is not yet available…

Lisa Betty

Lisa Betty is a PhD Candidate in History and Course Instructor at Fordham University.

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